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Victims of a Texas elementary school shooting are seeking a $27 billion class action lawsuit against city and state police, the city of Uvalde and other school and law enforcement officials for failing to follow active shooter protocol, according to the lawsuit filed this week. The lawsuit filed this week seeks damages for survivors of the May 24 shooting who were present and have sustained “emotional or psychological damages as a result of the defendants’ conduct and omissions on that date.” Among those suing are school staff and representatives of minors who were present when a gunman stormed Robb Elementary, killing 19 children and two teachers.

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Infowars host Alex Jones has filed for personal bankruptcy protection in Texas as he faces nearly $1.5 billion in court judgments over conspiracy theories he spread about the Sandy Hook school massacre.

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The Supreme Court says the Biden administration program to cancel student loans will remain blocked for now, but the justices have agreed to take up the case in late winter. The court’s decision to hear arguments relatively quickly means it is likely to determine whether the widespread loan cancellations are legal by late June. That’s about two months before the newly extended pause on loan repayments is set to expire. The administration had wanted a court order that would have allowed the program to take effect even as court challenges proceed. But as a fallback, it suggested the high court hold arguments and decide the issue.

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Rose Bowl game organizers have cleared the way for the College Football Playoff to expand to 12 teams starting in the 2024 season. They've told CFP officials they are willing to alter agreements for the first two years of the larger playoff. A person with knowledge of the discussions between game organizers and CFP officials told The Associated Press that the Rose Bowl is prepared to be flexible and wants to continue to be part of the College Football Playoff beyond 2025. The person spoke on condition of anonymity because the presidents and chancellors who oversee the playoff still needed to give final approval on expansion plans.

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Authorities say two correctional officers shot and killed two incarcerated people who were stabbing a fellow inmate at a Northern California prison.  The Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation says staff at High Desert State Prison in Susanville responded Tuesday after Anthony Aguilera was attacked by two men wielding makeshift weapons. Officials say when the attackers ignored verbal orders, officers fired a warning shot, deployed chemical agents and then opened fire. The stabbing victim was hospitalized in serious condition. The shooting is under investigation.

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Residents in several towns across Louisiana and Mississippi have taken cover amid the blare of tornado sirens amid a severe weather outbreak erupting in the Deep South. There were no immediate reports of damage from the potent storms late Tuesday, but multiple tornado warnings were issued. More than 25 million people are in the path of the vast storm system moving from Texas to Indiana and Georgia. The latest storm outlook says parts of Louisiana and Mississippi are at the highest risk for strong storms. Meanwhile, heavy snow was snarling traffic in parts of the Upper Midwest.

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Oath Keepers founder Stewart Rhodes has been convicted seditious conspiracy for a violent plot to overturn Democrat Joe Biden’s presidential win, handing the Justice Department a major victory in its massive prosecution of the Jan. 6, 2021, insurrection. A Washington, D.C., jury found Rhodes guilty of sedition after three days of deliberations in the the nearly two-month-long trial that showcased the far-right extremist group’s efforts to keep Republican Donald Trump in the White House at all costs.

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Twitter is no longer enforcing its policy against misinformation about COVID-19. The change was announced in an online update to Twitter's rules and comes after the platform was purchased by Elon Musk, who in the past has himself spread misleading COVID claims on Twitter. The platform enacted its COVID misinformation policy in early 2020 and since then has suspended more than 11,000 accounts and removed nearly 100,000 pieces of content that it deemed potentially harmful. Some users celebrated the change Tuesday while public health experts warned it could discourage vaccination and other efforts to combat the still-spreading virus.

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The Democratic San Francisco Board of Supervisors could allow police to use potentially lethal, remote-controlled robots in emergency situations. The 11-member board will vote Tuesday on a controversial proposal opposed by civil rights advocates critical of the militarization of police. The San Francisco Police Department said it would like the option to deploy robots equipped with explosive charges to disable suspects when lives are at stake. A new state law requires police and sheriffs departments to inventory its military grade equipment and seek approval for their use. Then-President Donald Trump signed an order in 2017 reviving a Pentagon program that dispenses surplus military equipment after his predecessor, Barack Obama, curtailed it in 2015.

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The federal government says it will spend $250 million over four years on environmental cleanup and restoration work around a drying Southern California lake that's fed by the depleted Colorado River. The agreement announced Monday on funding for the Salton Sea marks a key step in ongoing negotiations to conserve more of the river's water amid drought. The lake was formed in 1905 when the river overflowed and it's mostly fed by runoff from farms in California's Imperial Valley. But as those farms reduce their water use, less flows into that sea. That's caused water levels to shrink, exposing dry lake bed and dust that's harmful to nearby communities.