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California's Fourth Climate Change Assessment

As California continues battling wildfires and many communities face recovery from fires which are now contained, California’s Fourth Climate Change Assessment report is out and the prognosis is daunting.

Posted: Aug 29, 2018 10:41 AM

Chico, Calif. – As California continues battling wildfires and many communities face recovery from fires which are now contained, California’s Fourth Climate Change Assessment report is out and the prognosis is daunting.

The state this week released its report based on climate research, including dozens of scientific reports and summaries.

Some of the key findings of the report include an overview of current and projected future levels of green-house gas emissions. The report indicates that if green-house gas continues to increase, researchers say we can expect to see more, and more intense wildfires, as well as heat-related events throughout the state.

Researchers say residents may experience more frequent extreme weather, with sharp swings between periods of flooding and drought.

Residents are also warned of anticipated sea-level rise in coastal areas; enough say researchers to overtake two out of three Southern California beaches.

Research compiled in California’s Fourth Climate Change Assessment, takes global climate models, then scales them to regionally relevant data in order to support policy decisions taking place at the local, regional and state levels.

Robert Weisenmiller, Chair of the California Energy Commission says one of the primary findings in the report, is that climate-related events are happening much faster on the ground than originally anticipated by researches. He says for example, some of the studies looking at wildfires were saying by the end of the century things could get really bad, when in fact they got really bad last year.

Researchers say what is happening on the ground is confirming the science.

What do the climate forecast models mean for California and the future for residents? Researchers believe it indicates that now is the time when communities must adapt and plan and take actions to become more resilient in order to be prepared for climate-related changes.

California Coronavirus Cases

Data is updated nightly.

Cases: 1171802

Reported Deaths: 19025
CountyCasesDeaths
Los Angeles3832757580
San Bernardino884691129
Riverside850771434
San Diego75307988
Orange731521559
Kern39990448
Fresno37349477
Sacramento35739566
Santa Clara32454476
Alameda28378502
San Joaquin25675502
Contra Costa23381260
Stanislaus21145422
Tulare20550308
Ventura18914175
Imperial15725356
San Francisco15053160
Monterey14695116
San Mateo13707170
Sonoma11846157
Merced11537179
Santa Barbara11205135
Kings1044087
Solano1003681
Marin7628129
Placer622468
Madera604785
San Luis Obispo595635
Shasta460147
Yolo456174
Santa Cruz420228
Butte385359
Sutter314415
Napa294517
El Dorado21544
Yuba198110
San Benito181316
Lassen17733
Tehama158725
Mendocino148522
Nevada11839
Tuolumne9088
Glenn8918
Lake88619
Humboldt8199
Colusa6946
Siskiyou6242
Mono5243
Amador48416
Calaveras47522
Del Norte3131
Inyo29016
Plumas2050
Trinity1390
Mariposa1262
Modoc1220
Alpine470
Sierra190
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Chico
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Chester
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Frosty mornings are in the forecast through the weekend with highs every day in the mid-to-low 60s and sunny to mostly sunny skies.
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