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California's Fourth Climate Change Assessment

As California continues battling wildfires and many communities face recovery from fires which are now contained, California’s Fourth Climate Change Assessment report is out and the prognosis is daunting.

Posted: Aug 29, 2018 10:41 AM

Chico, Calif. – As California continues battling wildfires and many communities face recovery from fires which are now contained, California’s Fourth Climate Change Assessment report is out and the prognosis is daunting.

The state this week released its report based on climate research, including dozens of scientific reports and summaries.

Some of the key findings of the report include an overview of current and projected future levels of green-house gas emissions. The report indicates that if green-house gas continues to increase, researchers say we can expect to see more, and more intense wildfires, as well as heat-related events throughout the state.

Researchers say residents may experience more frequent extreme weather, with sharp swings between periods of flooding and drought.

Residents are also warned of anticipated sea-level rise in coastal areas; enough say researchers to overtake two out of three Southern California beaches.

Research compiled in California’s Fourth Climate Change Assessment, takes global climate models, then scales them to regionally relevant data in order to support policy decisions taking place at the local, regional and state levels.

Robert Weisenmiller, Chair of the California Energy Commission says one of the primary findings in the report, is that climate-related events are happening much faster on the ground than originally anticipated by researches. He says for example, some of the studies looking at wildfires were saying by the end of the century things could get really bad, when in fact they got really bad last year.

Researchers say what is happening on the ground is confirming the science.

What do the climate forecast models mean for California and the future for residents? Researchers believe it indicates that now is the time when communities must adapt and plan and take actions to become more resilient in order to be prepared for climate-related changes.

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