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California Democrats ponder reordered field in 2020 primary

California Democrats looking for a candidate to defeat President Donald Trump will pick from a suddenly reshaped presidential field.

Posted: Mar 3, 2020 1:53 PM

LOS ANGELES (AP) - California Democrats looking for a candidate to defeat President Donald Trump will pick from a suddenly reshaped presidential field.

California is one of 14 states that will vote on Super Tuesday. It’s the biggest prize by far, with more than 400 delegates at stake. The vote comes a day after Amy Klobuchar and Pete Buttigieg united behind Biden as party moderates look to halt the ascent of democratic socialist Sanders, the leading candidate after contests in Iowa, New Hampshire, Nevada and South Carolina.

At a Sacramento polling station Tuesday, California Gov. Gavin Newsom declined to say who he voted for but said recent endorsements for Biden are a “huge boost” to the former vice president.

“That was about as significant a night that you could have in politics before a major primary,” he said about Klobuchar and Buttigieg quitting the race and joining Biden on Monday in Dallas. Newsom predicted Biden’s momentum may drive more voters to the polls and that results will be “very clarifying” for the state of the race.

President Donald Trump, who lost California by over 4 million votes in 2016, faces only token opposition. Meanwhile, a series of contested U.S. House districts are on the ballot that could play into control of Congress in November.

It’s possible the primary could attract about half of the state’s nearly 21 million registered voters. Early voting began in February, and about 22% of 16 million mail-in ballots had been returned as of Monday, according to nonpartisan Political Data Inc.

Arguably, no candidate has more at stake in California than Sanders, the Vermont senator whose campaign has long seen the nation’s most populous state as a critical early contest and has had droves of volunteers organizing events across the state.

Sanders was on the California presidential ballot four years ago, when he picked up 46% of the vote in a losing effort against Hillary Clinton. He’s hoping for a comeback that would be a capstone moment for the state’s progressive wing, and a string of recent polls have shown him with an advantage over his remaining rivals.

But Sanders is also facing unpredictable factors, not the least of which is who actually votes. Some of Sanders’ strongest supporters, including young people and Hispanics, tend to be among the least reliable voters. They were trailing other groups in mail-in ballots returned through Monday.

At the same time, moderate Democrats are clearing the field for South Carolina primary winner Biden, fearing that a Sanders ticket could doom the party’s chances in November. Another recent exit from the race was California billionaire Tom Steyer, who stepped out Saturday.

Anyone who already voted for Klobuchar, Buttigieg or Steyer can’t change their vote.

State election rules intended to increase participation make it likely that ballot-counting could continue for weeks in close contests. Another unknown was Bloomberg, the former New York City mayor who has spent tens of millions of dollars in advertising, is on the ballot for the first time on Super Tuesday.

Four years ago, many Sanders supporters were dejected after his defeat and suspicious of an election process they believe tilted unfairly to Clinton. But his volunteer corps regrouped, and a candidate once considered on the political fringe has this year accumulated more delegates than any other Democrat so far.

On supporters of Sanders seeing the Democratic establishment trying to thwart the progressive candidate, Newsom said “it’s the nature of the process.” But he said the party will unify as before November.

The swift reordering of the Democratic contest could provide an opening for Biden, who has been slipping in state polls. He might have another hidden advantage: California prides itself on being the birthplace of the next great thing, but in politics its voters sometimes look backward and favor the familiar.

For example, in the 2008 Democratic presidential primary, when much of the nation was lining up with eventual nominee Barack Obama, California delivered a comfortable victory for Clinton, whose husband, Bill Clinton, carried the state in 1992 and 1996.

Biden was back in California Tuesday. Warren, meanwhile, dug in and made her closing California pitch in a heavily Hispanic neighborhood near Los Angeles, where she told the story of Latina janitors who organized and fought for better working conditions three decades ago.

She drew an immediate contrast with Biden, saying nominating a “Washington insider will not meet this moment.” While she didn’t mention Sanders by name, she offered herself as the progressive who can get things done.

Tulsi Gabbard, who has lagged badly in early contests, also remains in the race.

The long-running tension between the party’s progressive wing and its center-left establishment has defined the presidential contest again, as it has for years in many races in California. A Sanders victory would signal a continuing shift to the political left in which voters embrace his “revolution” that includes tuition-free college, breaking up big banks and revamping an economy that has produced a yawning divide between the very wealthy and workaday Americans.

The big change from 2016?

Sanders has made inroads with people of color, especially Hispanics, Sanders pollster Ben Tulchin said. In Nevada, support from Latinos, black people and union members, among others, helped him handily win the caucuses.

“We’ve put together a multiracial, diverse coalition that is putting Bernie in a strong position” to win California and a trove of delegates, Tulchin said.

California delegates are partly divvied up in what amounts to 53 separate elections in congressional districts. A candidate must win 15% of the vote in a district to qualify for at least one delegate.

Sanders has pushed back against suggestions that his agenda is pulling the party too far from the center.

“I don’t think so, I honestly don’t,” the Vermont senator told California Democrats at a convention last year.

California Coronavirus Cases

Data is updated nightly.

Confirmed Cases: 516851

Reported Deaths: 9441
CountyConfirmedDeaths
Los Angeles1938774702
Orange37813651
Riverside37011695
San Bernardino33432418
San Diego29883565
Kern20651144
Fresno15083138
San Joaquin11885180
Alameda11524189
Santa Clara10794191
Sacramento10122145
Tulare9745189
Imperial9448222
Stanislaus9221112
Contra Costa8033127
Ventura734476
San Francisco691661
Santa Barbara616760
San Mateo5683119
Marin509270
Monterey492430
Kings445356
Merced428550
Solano361137
Sonoma311339
Madera194330
Placer192516
San Luis Obispo190216
Yolo157242
Santa Cruz11524
Butte9417
Napa8888
Sutter7976
San Benito6474
El Dorado6371
Lassen6260
Yuba5024
Shasta3909
Glenn3321
Colusa3314
Mendocino3229
Nevada2991
Tehama2341
Humboldt2334
Lake2081
Mono1451
Tuolumne1412
Amador1260
Calaveras1251
Del Norte880
Siskiyou730
Inyo611
Mariposa572
Plumas330
Trinity50
Alpine20
Modoc20
Sierra20
Unassigned00
Chico
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Oroville
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Paradise
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Chester
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Red Bluff
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Willows
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Staying hot and hazy today, but relief from the heat is on the way for the middle of this week. We'll also have the potential for mountain thunderstorms on Wednesday. The heat returns this weekend.
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