Butte County Officials Offering Help Get Pets Adopted, If Owner Can No Longer Care for Them

Officials from Butte County say they are offering help for evacuees saying to let them know if they can no longer care for their animal. And "as a last resort" they can help get their pet adopted out.

Posted: Nov 25, 2018 2:41 PM
Updated: Nov 25, 2018 5:28 PM

*Correction, Butte County officials are not saying if animals are not picked up that they will be adopted out. We have made a correction to the previous article.

BUTTE COUNTY, Calif. – Officials from Butte County say they are offering help for evacuees saying to let them know if they can no longer care for their animal. And "as a last resort" they can help get their pet adopted out.

Sad Dog

Their number one focus is working with pet owners to help them identify long-term solutions and transition for their pets out of those temporary shelters, said Lisa Almaguer from Butte County Public Health. 

One-thousand six-hundred and one animals are being housed at four different Camp Fire shelter locations in Butte County by Butte County Animal Control, the North Valley Animal Disaster Group and the Humane Society of the United States.

Officials said the current locations are only temporary and are not set up for permanent sheltering.

The County has requested that residents begin planning for long-term care options for their animals in order to ensure sheltered animals remain as healthy as possible. When sheltered for extended periods of time animals may suffer emotionally and physically. County officials and their partners believe it is best for the health of the animals to transition out of temporary shelters as soon as possible.

Evacuees who are unable to care for their animals are encouraged to check with friends or family who may be available to foster them. Additionally, evacuees may consider searching on social media for foster groups or individuals willing to foster animals who have been displaced by the wildfires.

If evacuees are not able to identify any care options for their animals, they are asked to contact the shelter and surrender them so they may be adopted. While this is an incredibly difficult decision to make, allowing animals to be adopted as a last resort will ensure the optimal health for these beloved animals.

Picking-up Your Animal from the Shelter
If owners are able to pick up their animals, they should bring a photo ID and the pink copy of their animal intake form. You may still pick-up your animal without a form with a photo ID. Owners also need to provide their own transportation for their pets or livestock when leaving the shelter.

Butte County Animal Shelters
• Oroville: Small Animal Shelter | Old County Hospital
22279 Del Oro and Mono, Oroville, CA
• Chico: Small Animal Shelter | Chico Municipal Airport
150 Airpark Blvd., Chico, CA
• Richvale: Small Animal Shelter | Humane Society of the United States
1210 Richvale Highway, Richvale, CA
• Gridley: Large Animal Shelter | Butte County Fairgrounds
199 E. Hazel St., Gridley, CA

Re-location of Lost Animals
If your animal is lost, please visit www.campfirerescuedanimals.com and search the photo library of lost animals and resources. Many animals considered lost are being sheltered at the Chico Municipal Airport.

Here is the phone number for the NVADG - North Valley Animal Disaster Group - (530) 895-0000

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