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When will you get your stimulus payment, and how?

A second round of stimulus payments are...

Posted: Jan 4, 2021 2:33 PM
Updated: Jan 5, 2021 7:30 AM

A second round of stimulus payments are on the way and many eligible families are expected to receive the money this month.

The first payments started going out on December 29 and will continue to be sent through January 15. But anyone eligible who isn't automatically sent the money by then will have to claim it on their 2020 tax return, according to the Internal Revenue Service.

Congress included the $600 payments in a sweeping pandemic aid bill passed just before Christmas. President Donald Trump stalled the bill, calling for $2,000 payments though he had largely left negotiations up to lawmakers and his Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, then ultimately signed it into law after a week-long delay.

The money comes nearly eight months after the first round of stimulus payments, worth up to $1,200 per person, were sent as part of a larger coronavirus relief package passed last March. Many of the same people will receive the money again, but there are some small eligibility differences.

When and how will the money be sent?

Recipients may have seen a direct deposit pending in their bank account as early as December 29, but the funds became officially available January 4.

Paper checks or debit cards will be sent to those who don't already have a bank account on file with the Internal Revenue Service. Checks also began going out last week.

Some people may not receive the money the same way as in the first round. If you received a preloaded debit card last year, the payment will not be added to that card. You'll either receive a new card in the mail or a paper check.

The law requires the Internal Revenue Service to stop issuing the payments after January 15. Those not issued a payment by then will have wait to claim it on their 2020 tax return. The money will either increase your refund or reduce the taxes you owe. If the payment was sent to an old bank account, you will also have to wait to file your taxes in order to receive the money

People can check the status of both their first and second payments by using the Internal Revenue Service's Get My Payment online tool.

Who is eligible?

Eligibility is largely based on income. Individuals earning less than $75,000 a year will receive the full $600. Heads of household earning less than $112,500 and married couples filing jointly earning less than $150,000 are also due the full amount. They will receive $600 per child under the age of 17, which is $100 more than in the first round.

The payments start phasing out for people making more money, at a rate of $5 per $100 of additional income. Some people who received the first payment may be phased out of the second round because the payments are smaller.

They will phase out entirely at $87,000 for single filers without children and $174,000 for those married filing jointly without children, according to an analysis by the Tax Foundation.

Undocumented immigrants who don't have Social Security numbers remain ineligible for the payments. But in a change from the first round, their spouses and children are now eligible as long as they have Social Security numbers.

Those who are claimed as a dependent on someone else's tax return, like some college students, remain ineligible.

Lost your job? You may be able to claim more money

Both the first and second round payments are based on 2019 adjust gross incomes. That means that someone who saw their income drastically fall in 2020 may be eligible for more money than they first received.

If that's the case, they may claim a 'Recovery Rebate Credit' on their 2020 tax return. The credit eligibility and the credit amount will be based on the 2020 tax year income, according to the Internal Revenue Service.

Those who may have earned more in 2020 than 2019 are not required to pay back money they have already received.

California Coronavirus Cases

Data is updated nightly.

Cases: 3074812

Reported Deaths: 35060
CountyCasesDeaths
Los Angeles103873814416
San Bernardino2569141560
Riverside2510002676
San Diego2185552174
Orange2165092508
Santa Clara949051129
Kern87240572
Fresno83200968
Sacramento811831128
Alameda68649788
Ventura62774462
San Joaquin58843788
Contra Costa53349460
Stanislaus43121766
Tulare42186515
Monterey36464255
San Mateo32887309
San Francisco29502266
Solano25983107
Santa Barbara25405243
Imperial25333474
Merced24570316
Sonoma24184242
Kings19588148
Placer17490184
San Luis Obispo16056140
Madera13528151
Santa Cruz12461113
Marin11732159
Yolo10789138
Shasta9750123
Butte9528128
El Dorado788649
Sutter782879
Napa767244
Lassen519916
San Benito500346
Yuba499627
Tehama433244
Tuolumne340340
Nevada323474
Mendocino319232
Amador302431
Lake262531
Humboldt242725
Glenn194820
Colusa17969
Calaveras162123
Siskiyou145713
Mono11244
Inyo98329
Del Norte8672
Plumas5895
Modoc3853
Mariposa3464
Trinity3044
Sierra820
Alpine730
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Thursday was the last fairly quiet weather day that we'll have in northern California as a series of storms will move our way through next week. Our first chance for rain and snow showers arrives Friday morning with a cold front.
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