U.S. embassies preparing for security risks from release of torture report

Dec 9, 2014 7:11 AM by Cheryl Wengren

WASHINGTON (AP) - American embassies, military units and other U.S. interests are preparing for possible security threats related to the release today of a report on the CIA's harsh interrogation techniques at secret overseas facilities after the 9/11 terror attacks.

The report from the Senate Intelligence Committee will be the first public accounting of the CIA's use of what critics call torture on al-Qaida detainees held at "black" sites in Europe and Asia. The committee is expected to release a 480-page executive summary of the 6,000-plus-page report compiled by Democrats on the panel.

U.S. officials who have read the report say it includes disturbing new details about the CIA's use of such techniques as sleep deprivation, confinement in small spaces, humiliation and the simulated drowning process known as waterboarding. It alleges that the harsh interrogations failed to produce unique and life-saving intelligence - a conclusion disputed by current and former intelligence officials, including CIA Director John Brennan.

It also asserts that the CIA lied about the covert program to officials at the White House, the Justice Department and congressional oversight committees.


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