Government shutdown: Senate fails to reach a deal

The federal government shut down at the stroke of midnight Friday, halting all but the most essential operations and marring the one-year anniversary of President Donald Trump’s inauguration in a striking display of Washington dysfunction.

Posted: Jan. 19, 2018 10:50 PM
Updated: Jan. 19, 2018 10:54 PM

The federal government shut down at the stroke of midnight Friday, halting all but the most essential operations and marring the one-year anniversary of President Donald Trump’s inauguration in a striking display of Washington dysfunction.

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Last-minute negotiations crumbled as Senate Democrats blocked a four-week stopgap extension in a late-night vote, causing the fourth government shutdown in a quarter century. The slide toward closure lacked for high drama: The Senate vote was all but predetermined, and since the shutdown began at the start of a weekend, many of the immediate effects will be muted for most Americans.

Still, it comes with no shortage of embarrassment for the president and political risk for both parties, as they wager that voters will punish the other at the ballot box in November.

Social Security and most other safety net programs are unaffected by the lapse in federal spending authority. Critical government functions will continue, with uniformed service members, health inspectors and law enforcement officers set to work without pay. But if no deal is brokered before Monday, hundreds of thousands of federal employees will be furloughed.

With the funding measure stalled in the Senate, Action News Now wanted to know what Congressman Doug LaMalfa has to say about the government shutdown.

Congressman LaMalfa said he's dissapointed in the Senate's failure to agree on a government funding measure.

As Californians now worry about how the government shutdown will impact them, Congressman LaMalfa is hopeful the effects will be minimal.

The congressman said the Veterans Administration is funded longer term and will continue to keep operations in place, even if the shutdown lasts for a few days.

In regards to national parks, the parks service says it is trying to maintain some access for visitors.

Officials from California parks did not release more details on Thursday about whether they'd be able to open their gates.

"Talking with my colleagues and there's a determination we need to get done sooner than later. There are people wondering if their paychecks will come if social security will come. But I'm confident in the president and the White House that they will do everything to minimize the effects on the American people," said Congressman LaMalfa.

The congressman said negotiations are continuing regarding DACA, but it's still not clear when a decision will be made.

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