Blind lamb inspires children's book, teaches compassion

A blind lamb in Jefferson County, Wisconsin teaching children about empathy, compassion and overcoming adversity, a spirited and determined farm animal that inspired this children's book.

Posted: Feb. 4, 2018 12:09 PM
Updated: Feb. 4, 2018 12:18 PM

Jefferson County, WI - A blind lamb in Jefferson County, Wisconsin teaching children about empathy, compassion and overcoming adversity, a spirited and determined farm animal that inspired this children's book.

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The lamb behind the book named peanut is as curious as ever.

This book has reached hundreds of kids and will soon be available to an even wider audience.

Jim and Laura Thompson had the book made into a braille version and they gave the first copy to a 9-year-old boy in Jefferson.

"Peanut" uses her senses of smell, hearing, taste, and touch to navigate through life.

On this day - she heard a new sound walking closer to the barn.

This is 9, soon to be 10-year-old Bennet and he's meeting "Peanut" for the very first time.

He got to pet her.

"It's like a wool sheet its soft and not at the same time," Bennet said. 

And fed her apples.

Bennet says when he first heard the book - he sensed an instant connection.

"I thought it was a lot like me in the way I overcome my challenges in the same way Peanut does. In the book says how peanut can hear her flock and I can tell people's voices."

Bennet and his mom Amy Lehman were excited to meet "Peanut" after they went to the book presentation at Jefferson library.

"It was special for him to meet peanut to see she is just like the rest of the sheep and to see he is like the rest of the kids," Lehman said. 

Amy scheduled this meeting for weeks.

And little did Bennet know. Jim and Laura had a big surprise for him.

"I don't have to ask mom or dad to read it to me, that's great. I can do interpretive reading instead of memorizing it so I think that was really special that they thought of me when they gave me the first copy," Bennet said. 

The Thompson's have been working for months to get the book made into braille.

Laura Thompson says all of their work has paid off for this moment.

"It was a special moment that was very touching that he got the first copy of the book in braille. Bennet said it best because they've overcome their challenges but I would add they are both smart. That's how they overcome their challenges and that was touching to see that and to top it off with the book and we are proud of it," said Laura Thompson. 

In the middle of Feb., they plan on fundraising to get 500 copies of the braille version made to give it to those who use that format.

Bennet didn't just leave with some new friends, he left with a story he can share with others.

"I will remember this experience for a long time, probably forever," Bennet said. 

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